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Hip Bursitis



Greater Trochanteric Bursitis (GTB) is a common condition characterized by pain and inflammation of the bursa located on the outer part of the hip, known as the greater trochanter. This condition is most commonly seen in middle-aged women and individuals who engage in repetitive activities involving the hips, such as runners, cyclists, and dancers. The bursa is a fluid-filled sac that helps to reduce friction and cushion the bones, tendons, and muscles around a joint. When this bursa becomes inflamed, it can cause pain and discomfort, particularly with movements that involve the hip joint. The most common symptoms of GTB include pain on the outer part of the hip, tenderness to the touch, and difficulty sleeping on the affected side. In some cases, the pain may radiate down the thigh or even to the knee. The pain may be exacerbated by activities such as walking, running, climbing stairs, or sitting for prolonged periods. There are several factors that can contribute to the development of GTB. These include overuse or repetitive activities involving the hip joint, poor biomechanics or alignment of the hip joint, trauma or injury to the hip, and certain medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment for GTB typically involves a combination of conservative measures such as rest, ice, physical therapy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In some cases, a corticosteroid injection may be recommended to help reduce inflammation and pain. For more severe cases of GTB that do not respond to conservative measures, surgery may be necessary to remove the inflamed bursa or correct any underlying hip joint abnormalities. In summary, Greater Trochanteric Bursitis is a common condition that can cause pain and discomfort on the outer part of the hip. Early intervention and conservative treatment can help to relieve symptoms and prevent the condition from progressing to a more severe stage. If you are experiencing hip pain, it is important to consult with your healthcare provider for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.


Physical therapy: Excessive pressure can be placed over the bursa on outside of the hip from the muscles that provide pronation control during upright activities. The knee going inward, the contralateral hip dropping or excessive flattening of the foot during stance phase can make the IT band rub over the greater trochanteric bursa. These exercises below can improve your pronation control so that this can't happen again in the future.

  1. Start with these Level 1 exercises. Do at least for 1 week or until you can do 3 sets of 25 easily before moving on to level 2. Do 3 sets of 5-25 reps for each exercise



Physical therapy: Start with these Level 1 exercises.

Do at least for 1 week or until you can do 3 sets of 25 easily before moving on to level 2. Do 3 sets of 5-25 reps for each exercise





Sidelying Hip External Rotation

Bottom leg, Foot Rotates up and down on a fixed hip and knee position as shown









Sidelying Hip Abduction

Top Leg is straight, Toes point down, Leg Lifts up and down










Sideplank

Keep your body as straight as possible lift hips to air and back down











Posterior Tibialis Foot Raises

Point foot down and then bring foot up toward the cieling










Posterior Tibialis Foot Curls

Point foot down and then bring foot up toward the cieling







Level 2 Exercises


Do until you can do 3 sets of 25 easily. Do 3 sets of 5-25 reps for each exercise.




Standing Hip External Rotation

Wrap band or cable around buttocks. Rotate hips against resistance. Use only the stance leg hip to rotate.










Posterior Tibialis Heel Raises

Squeeze ball with heels while performing heel raises up and down. Keep ball back on Heel.









Standing Side Stepping

Turn feet inward, take a big step with your lead leg and slow step with the trail leg. Don't let toes rotate outward.









Sideplank with Leg Lifts

Keep your body straight, lift hips to air and lift leg up and down with toes rotated down toward the ground









Toe Curl Walking

Walk with your toes curled until cramping is felt in the arch. Recover for 30 sec then repeat

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